Tax Debt & Bankruptcy

Generally, Minneapolis bankruptcy attorney advocates that if you owe debts to the Internal Revenue Service or other State’s equivalent agencies, the debt is not dischargeable in bankruptcy but for very particular circumstances concerned. In case of bankruptcy Chapter 7, a complete discharge of allowable debts is possible whereas in bankruptcy Chapter 13 a payment arrangement is designed to disburse some debts while the remaining debts are discharged. In the bankruptcy laws, usually the tax debts are taken care of in the same manner as in both bankruptcy Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 petitions. The majority of tax debts cannot be discharged in bankruptcy says Minneapolis bankruptcy lawyer. A bankruptcy petitioner who has tax debts has to essentially fulfill the required five criteria for discharge and the majority of people are not able to fulfill these criteria.

All tax debts are related to a specific tax return and tax year keeping that in consideration the bankruptcy law has laid out specified criteria in relation to how old a tax debt can be explains Minneapolis bankruptcy attorney.

If the income tax debt of a petitioner fulfills all of the five rules, then that tax debt can be discharged in Chapter 7 and Chapter 13 bankruptcy petitions. The Five Rules to Discharge Tax Debts are listed here: 1. The due date is at any rate three years ago for filing a tax return. 2. The tax return has been filed at any rate two years ago. 3. The tax assessment done is at any rate 240 days old. 4. The tax return has not been fraudulent. 5. The taxpayer has not been at fault of tax evasion.

Some ‘Tax Debts’ are ‘Not Dischargeable’ according to Minneapolis bankruptcy lawyer such as the tax debts arising from unfiled tax returns. The IRS customarily reviews tax on unfiled returns. However, only if the taxpayer files a tax return for the year in question such tax liabilities cannot be discharged.

Prior to a Chapter 7 or Chapter 13 bankruptcy is granted, the bankruptcy petitioner needs to provide evidence that the four preceding tax returns have been filed with the IRS and not after the date of the first creditors’ meeting in a bankruptcy case as well as offer a copy of their most recent tax return to the bankruptcy court.

About the author:

Richard writes for the legal and bankruptcy law website Minneapolis bankruptcy help. The law firm has an enviable track record of helping companies and individuals file for bankruptcy protection successfully. For any of your bankruptcy problems meet their and get rid of your financial woes.

Related Posts